Too many experts who write a book feel that the book is the same thing as their expertise or their business, as if it were a math equation like this:

My book = my business

No. If you think this way, you will observe the following:

  • You will feel that your book has to be the perfect representation of everything you know about your area of expertise.
  • You will labor longer and harder than necessary in a misguided attempt at perfection.
  • You will be more likely to sift through years worth of notes than write something that solves a problem for your reader—for your ideal customer

Do not make the mistake of thinking that your book has to be the Ultimate Tome on your topic.

First off, you are not writing on a “topic.” This isn\’t a term paper. You are taking the reader on a path from problem to solution. However, you don\’t want or need to write an all-encompassing manual.

Don\’t make the mistake of thinking that your book IS your business. It is a tool, but it is not an equation. You can and indeed SHOULD use the book as a basis for workshops and other products, but your book is not the same as your business.

Please do the following activity. Not in your head. Out loud.

Please stand up. Clear your throat. And in a loud, clear voice, say, “My book is NOT my business. My book is NOT my business. My book is NOT my business!”

Confused? It\’s simple. If your business is a house, your book is a DOOR. Think of your book as a point of entry, not the All Encompassing Comprehensive Tome Culminating All My Knowledge in One Place.

Your book is just a doorway. If you craft it the way I teach you, you\’ll be able to use the same structure in your book for workshops, coaching, consulting and more, but the book itself is a doorway. The reader knocks on the door and you invite him in. Treat him well and he\’ll be a raving fan.

Your Book is a Door leading the reader from her problem to the solution only you can bring. When she opens this wonderful door, she needs to have confidence that her problem will be solved by the time she finishes the book. The only reason she gets your book is because she\’s in pain—she has a problem—and she wants to trust that you will solve it for her.

You need to plan for this as you write by putting the following elements in place:

  • A sizzling book title
  • A subtitle that tells people why they should buy the book (what\’s in it for them?)
  • A specific purpose for the book
  • Endorsements on the back cover
  • Emotionally compelling pitch on the back cover
  • Awesome chapter titles that make you want to read
  • Well laid out contents
  • Easy to follow path from problem/pain to solution
  • Easy to read and understand
  • True Problem/solution

The person thinking of buying your book must feel that he will be better off after reading the book than he was at the beginning. He needs to know his problem will no longer exist because you are showing him step by step how to get rid of it.

WHEW!

And all this is before the person makes a decision to buy and before geting to know you and your material. This is before the reader truly starts doing business with you.

Once someone does buy your book, it needs to guide them confidently step by step to a real solution. And one more thing.

The end of the book is not the end. It is the beginning of a deeper relationship the reader will develop with YOU.